Leveraging 5G for Autonomous Driving – An EU Project x BMW

Client 5G Carmen EU Project x BMW Embedded Development

Sep 2022,

„This project is a great example of the importance of good collaboration in an ever more complex environment. It united cutting-edge tech with a focal societal problem statement. And all of that with well-aligned and trustworthy project partners at BMW.”

Daniel Turba, Project Manager at Motius

The Goal

Demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for cooperative driving applications within an EU-wide, inter-corporational project named 5G Carmen.

The Solution

We provided the onboard software and maneuvering algorithms for Cooperative Lane Management (CLM), enabling coordinated actions like autonomous overtaking and lane merging.

The Impact

Identification of further challenges to achieve smooth cross-border cooperative driving. The basis for more targeted research funding in the future has been created.

Leveraging 5G for Autonomous Driving

What are the advantages of 5G for automotive applications? And more specifically: What are the implications of 5G for autonomous driving? These were the overarching questions of our joint Cooperative Lane Management (CLM) project with members of the 5G Carmen consortium.

Test Vehicle cooperative lane changing 5g Carmen EU project

5G Carmen is an EU-wide project with many participants for a bigger scope. The goal: To demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for automotive applications, seamlessly crossing borders and connecting vehicles on the road with 5G. The objective of the sub-project CLM was to create a system that allows cars to perform autonomous coordinated actions, like overtaking and lane merging. The system had to be scalable to hundreds, even thousands of cars, to enable use cases like efficient traffic control on a large road section.

On A Joint Mission

One of the most interesting, but also challenging aspects of this project, was the level of international and inter-corporational collaboration. To tackle the big scope of the project objective, we teamed up with a broad range of industry experts (Nokia, Qualcomm, BMW, Stellantis, and many more) for approximately one year.

onboard software for autonomous driving with 5g carmen eu project

The whole system was made of many components that work together as a data pipeline. Motius provided the crucial parts of the algorithm: the onboard software and the maneuvering service. Meanwhile, other partners provided the infrastructure that enables the transport of data.

“The biggest challenge was the coordination of over ten parties in a very codependent system. The underlying conditions were often changing, and we had to achieve seamless integration of our sub-system into the whole system, while every step would affect the others and vice versa.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

A Precise GNSS System & Edge Computing

Now let’s get to the exciting technical stuff! The onboard software runs on each car and collects information about the car: GPS position, speed, and the indicator status. The GPS position is provided by a Motius-developed precision GNSS system that tracks the car with an accuracy of a few centimeters.

Each car sends these informations to the maneuvering service which implements an algorithm to control each car’s speed for the optimal procedure of the maneuver. Now the magic can happen: In case of overtaking, the maneuvering service will open up a gap between two cars and merge the overtaking car in between.

The system is locally using a centralized approach, which means that each car has its own 5G connectivity and sends data to a central maneuvering service. The maneuvering service is deployed on edge computing units called MECs. These MECs are physically located very close to the mobile network stations to minimize network transport times. By design, there are many MECs deployed along the Autobahn, so each MECs only needs to handle the traffic that is close to its location. So far, so good. But does it work?

The fact that we used cutting-edge technologies gave us stability, fast implementation speed and great flexibility to adapt and extend our system to real world situations. It was thrilling to see how all the components we’re composed into a great system. (Shiyue Liu, Lead Engineer Embedded Systems)

Testing at the Austrian-German Border

To finish the project, we needed some proper testing. This is why we met up with BMW (one of our 5G Carmen project partners) to see our software working in a real-life scenario. The final demo shows an overtaking scenario on a public road, demonstrating it in a real-world environment. Because of legal reasons, the cars are still required to have real drivers, but the drivers are following the instructions that are being sent by the CLM system.

The goal of the final demo was to show the capability of the system running on public roads in proximity to the German-Austrian border. On each side of the border, there is a MEC deployed that takes over the maneuvering depending on which side of the border the maneuver takes place. The driver or user will not notice the handover of responsibilities. Also, we used this opportunity to record data from the maneuvers that allow us to analyze the advantages of 5G over 4G.

“My personal highlight was our collaboration with BMW, which worked really well here. It was very trustful and we were closely aligned. Which allowed us to effectively complete our contribution to the overarching 5G Carmen project.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

Want to build products of the future?

The Goal

Demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for cooperative driving applications within an EU-wide, inter-corporational project named 5G Carmen.

The Solution

We provided the onboard software and maneuvering algorithms for Cooperative Lane Management (CLM), enabling coordinated actions like autonomous overtaking and lane merging.

The Impact

Identification of further challenges to achieve smooth cross-border cooperative driving. The basis for more targeted research funding in the future has been created.

Leveraging 5G for Autonomous Driving

What are the advantages of 5G for automotive applications? And more specifically: What are the implications of 5G for autonomous driving? These were the overarching questions of our joint Cooperative Lane Management (CLM) project with members of the 5G Carmen consortium.

Test Vehicle cooperative lane changing 5g Carmen EU project

5G Carmen is an EU-wide project with many participants for a bigger scope. The goal: To demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for automotive applications, seamlessly crossing borders and connecting vehicles on the road with 5G. The objective of the sub-project CLM was to create a system that allows cars to perform autonomous coordinated actions, like overtaking and lane merging. The system had to be scalable to hundreds, even thousands of cars, to enable use cases like efficient traffic control on a large road section.

On A Joint Mission

One of the most interesting, but also challenging aspects of this project, was the level of international and inter-corporational collaboration. To tackle the big scope of the project objective, we teamed up with a broad range of industry experts (Nokia, Qualcomm, BMW, Stellantis, and many more) for approximately one year.

onboard software for autonomous driving with 5g carmen eu project

The whole system was made of many components that work together as a data pipeline. Motius provided the crucial parts of the algorithm: the onboard software and the maneuvering service. Meanwhile, other partners provided the infrastructure that enables the transport of data.

“The biggest challenge was the coordination of over ten parties in a very codependent system. The underlying conditions were often changing, and we had to achieve seamless integration of our sub-system into the whole system, while every step would affect the others and vice versa.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

A Precise GNSS System & Edge Computing

Now let’s get to the exciting technical stuff! The onboard software runs on each car and collects information about the car: GPS position, speed, and the indicator status. The GPS position is provided by a Motius-developed precision GNSS system that tracks the car with an accuracy of a few centimeters.

Each car sends these informations to the maneuvering service which implements an algorithm to control each car’s speed for the optimal procedure of the maneuver. Now the magic can happen: In case of overtaking, the maneuvering service will open up a gap between two cars and merge the overtaking car in between.

The system is locally using a centralized approach, which means that each car has its own 5G connectivity and sends data to a central maneuvering service. The maneuvering service is deployed on edge computing units called MECs. These MECs are physically located very close to the mobile network stations to minimize network transport times. By design, there are many MECs deployed along the Autobahn, so each MECs only needs to handle the traffic that is close to its location. So far, so good. But does it work?

The fact that we used cutting-edge technologies gave us stability, fast implementation speed and great flexibility to adapt and extend our system to real world situations. It was thrilling to see how all the components we’re composed into a great system. (Shiyue Liu, Lead Engineer Embedded Systems)

Testing at the Austrian-German Border

To finish the project, we needed some proper testing. This is why we met up with BMW (one of our 5G Carmen project partners) to see our software working in a real-life scenario. The final demo shows an overtaking scenario on a public road, demonstrating it in a real-world environment. Because of legal reasons, the cars are still required to have real drivers, but the drivers are following the instructions that are being sent by the CLM system.

The goal of the final demo was to show the capability of the system running on public roads in proximity to the German-Austrian border. On each side of the border, there is a MEC deployed that takes over the maneuvering depending on which side of the border the maneuver takes place. The driver or user will not notice the handover of responsibilities. Also, we used this opportunity to record data from the maneuvers that allow us to analyze the advantages of 5G over 4G.

“My personal highlight was our collaboration with BMW, which worked really well here. It was very trustful and we were closely aligned. Which allowed us to effectively complete our contribution to the overarching 5G Carmen project.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

Want to build products of the future?

The Goal

Demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for cooperative driving applications within an EU-wide, inter-corporational project named 5G Carmen.

The Solution

We provided the onboard software and maneuvering algorithms for Cooperative Lane Management (CLM), enabling coordinated actions like autonomous overtaking and lane merging.

The Impact

Identification of further challenges to achieve smooth cross-border cooperative driving. The basis for more targeted research funding in the future has been created.

Leveraging 5G for Autonomous Driving

What are the advantages of 5G for automotive applications? And more specifically: What are the implications of 5G for autonomous driving? These were the overarching questions of our joint Cooperative Lane Management (CLM) project with members of the 5G Carmen consortium.

Test Vehicle cooperative lane changing 5g Carmen EU project

5G Carmen is an EU-wide project with many participants for a bigger scope. The goal: To demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for automotive applications, seamlessly crossing borders and connecting vehicles on the road with 5G. The objective of the sub-project CLM was to create a system that allows cars to perform autonomous coordinated actions, like overtaking and lane merging. The system had to be scalable to hundreds, even thousands of cars, to enable use cases like efficient traffic control on a large road section.

On A Joint Mission

One of the most interesting, but also challenging aspects of this project, was the level of international and inter-corporational collaboration. To tackle the big scope of the project objective, we teamed up with a broad range of industry experts (Nokia, Qualcomm, BMW, Stellantis, and many more) for approximately one year.

onboard software for autonomous driving with 5g carmen eu project

The whole system was made of many components that work together as a data pipeline. Motius provided the crucial parts of the algorithm: the onboard software and the maneuvering service. Meanwhile, other partners provided the infrastructure that enables the transport of data.

“The biggest challenge was the coordination of over ten parties in a very codependent system. The underlying conditions were often changing, and we had to achieve seamless integration of our sub-system into the whole system, while every step would affect the others and vice versa.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

A Precise GNSS System & Edge Computing

Now let’s get to the exciting technical stuff! The onboard software runs on each car and collects information about the car: GPS position, speed, and the indicator status. The GPS position is provided by a Motius-developed precision GNSS system that tracks the car with an accuracy of a few centimeters.

Each car sends these informations to the maneuvering service which implements an algorithm to control each car’s speed for the optimal procedure of the maneuver. Now the magic can happen: In case of overtaking, the maneuvering service will open up a gap between two cars and merge the overtaking car in between.

The system is locally using a centralized approach, which means that each car has its own 5G connectivity and sends data to a central maneuvering service. The maneuvering service is deployed on edge computing units called MECs. These MECs are physically located very close to the mobile network stations to minimize network transport times. By design, there are many MECs deployed along the Autobahn, so each MECs only needs to handle the traffic that is close to its location. So far, so good. But does it work?

The fact that we used cutting-edge technologies gave us stability, fast implementation speed and great flexibility to adapt and extend our system to real world situations. It was thrilling to see how all the components we’re composed into a great system. (Shiyue Liu, Lead Engineer Embedded Systems)

Testing at the Austrian-German Border

To finish the project, we needed some proper testing. This is why we met up with BMW (one of our 5G Carmen project partners) to see our software working in a real-life scenario. The final demo shows an overtaking scenario on a public road, demonstrating it in a real-world environment. Because of legal reasons, the cars are still required to have real drivers, but the drivers are following the instructions that are being sent by the CLM system.

The goal of the final demo was to show the capability of the system running on public roads in proximity to the German-Austrian border. On each side of the border, there is a MEC deployed that takes over the maneuvering depending on which side of the border the maneuver takes place. The driver or user will not notice the handover of responsibilities. Also, we used this opportunity to record data from the maneuvers that allow us to analyze the advantages of 5G over 4G.

“My personal highlight was our collaboration with BMW, which worked really well here. It was very trustful and we were closely aligned. Which allowed us to effectively complete our contribution to the overarching 5G Carmen project.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

Want to build products of the future?

The Goal

Demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for cooperative driving applications within an EU-wide, inter-corporational project named 5G Carmen.

The Solution

We provided the onboard software and maneuvering algorithms for Cooperative Lane Management (CLM), enabling coordinated actions like autonomous overtaking and lane merging.

The Impact

Identification of further challenges to achieve smooth cross-border cooperative driving. The basis for more targeted research funding in the future has been created.

Leveraging 5G for Autonomous Driving

What are the advantages of 5G for automotive applications? And more specifically: What are the implications of 5G for autonomous driving? These were the overarching questions of our joint Cooperative Lane Management (CLM) project with members of the 5G Carmen consortium.

Test Vehicle cooperative lane changing 5g Carmen EU project

5G Carmen is an EU-wide project with many participants for a bigger scope. The goal: To demonstrate the potential of 5G technology for automotive applications, seamlessly crossing borders and connecting vehicles on the road with 5G. The objective of the sub-project CLM was to create a system that allows cars to perform autonomous coordinated actions, like overtaking and lane merging. The system had to be scalable to hundreds, even thousands of cars, to enable use cases like efficient traffic control on a large road section.

On A Joint Mission

One of the most interesting, but also challenging aspects of this project, was the level of international and inter-corporational collaboration. To tackle the big scope of the project objective, we teamed up with a broad range of industry experts (Nokia, Qualcomm, BMW, Stellantis, and many more) for approximately one year.

onboard software for autonomous driving with 5g carmen eu project

The whole system was made of many components that work together as a data pipeline. Motius provided the crucial parts of the algorithm: the onboard software and the maneuvering service. Meanwhile, other partners provided the infrastructure that enables the transport of data.

“The biggest challenge was the coordination of over ten parties in a very codependent system. The underlying conditions were often changing, and we had to achieve seamless integration of our sub-system into the whole system, while every step would affect the others and vice versa.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

A Precise GNSS System & Edge Computing

Now let’s get to the exciting technical stuff! The onboard software runs on each car and collects information about the car: GPS position, speed, and the indicator status. The GPS position is provided by a Motius-developed precision GNSS system that tracks the car with an accuracy of a few centimeters.

Each car sends these informations to the maneuvering service which implements an algorithm to control each car’s speed for the optimal procedure of the maneuver. Now the magic can happen: In case of overtaking, the maneuvering service will open up a gap between two cars and merge the overtaking car in between.

The system is locally using a centralized approach, which means that each car has its own 5G connectivity and sends data to a central maneuvering service. The maneuvering service is deployed on edge computing units called MECs. These MECs are physically located very close to the mobile network stations to minimize network transport times. By design, there are many MECs deployed along the Autobahn, so each MECs only needs to handle the traffic that is close to its location. So far, so good. But does it work?

The fact that we used cutting-edge technologies gave us stability, fast implementation speed and great flexibility to adapt and extend our system to real world situations. It was thrilling to see how all the components we’re composed into a great system. (Shiyue Liu, Lead Engineer Embedded Systems)

Testing at the Austrian-German Border

To finish the project, we needed some proper testing. This is why we met up with BMW (one of our 5G Carmen project partners) to see our software working in a real-life scenario. The final demo shows an overtaking scenario on a public road, demonstrating it in a real-world environment. Because of legal reasons, the cars are still required to have real drivers, but the drivers are following the instructions that are being sent by the CLM system.

The goal of the final demo was to show the capability of the system running on public roads in proximity to the German-Austrian border. On each side of the border, there is a MEC deployed that takes over the maneuvering depending on which side of the border the maneuver takes place. The driver or user will not notice the handover of responsibilities. Also, we used this opportunity to record data from the maneuvers that allow us to analyze the advantages of 5G over 4G.

“My personal highlight was our collaboration with BMW, which worked really well here. It was very trustful and we were closely aligned. Which allowed us to effectively complete our contribution to the overarching 5G Carmen project.” (Daniel Turba, Project Manager)

Want to build products of the future?

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